top of page
6feet.jpg

The Way I See It; a Two, Four, Eight, Sixteen Sheep Story

I didn’t do well in high school. One of my worst subjects was mathematics in all its forms, so I didn’t formally learn about exponentials. Today I have gratitude to our herd of sheep for their patience in teaching me.

   

Our herd of ewes regularly numbers about 6-8. This year 5 of those were of an age that produced 6 lambs. Now 14 sheep. Occasionally they are joined by an elder ram and two to four wannabes. So, this year the herd at times grows to near 20 in number. 

   

Speaking of growing, in the early spring the grass just launched itself. You could practically see it get taller every day, like corn in Kansas. Now, a month later, we are back to being surrounded by golf greens. 

 

Speaking of growing, last fall we (read that as entirely Suzanne) planted nearly 1000 daffodil bulbs. We got three bouquets out of that crop this spring: one of seven, one of nine, and one of two. We usually have five to six resident deer, two does, an elder and junior buck, and one to three fawns. I have not seen a single deer in the last nine months.

   

The sheep browse heavily on everything they can reach. Clearly this is not sustainable. As the herd jumps in size each year, that is a lot of live-thirsty-stock: eg., gestating ewe or ram five litres; lactating ewe ten litres. So we are even with my crap arithmetic, at about a 100 litres per day, or depending where you're from, around 22-25 gallons a day, or about 750 gallons a month, or even maybe about 5,000 gallons for seven months outside of winter. If it gets dryer, this is unsustainable, so we will need to enclose the pond where they come at end of day to drink.

I suppose we can do something or nothing about this. I for one would like to roll through fields and forest and see flowers. One of our lambs will be prime in about 2 months; four of our lambs in four months; and then one late lamb in six months. Just saying.

   

My gratitude to the sheep for helping me see things clearly and understanding increases that become more and more rapid. I wonder what it is called when decreases become more and more rapid?  - Bye for now, Dolf.

bottom of page